A-frames have always been a timeless example of mid-century architecture. The name, of course, comes from their utilitarian design. Typical examples incorporate a sharp roof pitch that flows all the way down to the foundation. Conceptually this idea is straightforward, but it’s also unaccommodating. This is especially true for tiny home designs.

Sloping walls are the A-frame’s signature feature, and they tend to leave an awkward amount of unused space near the cabin’s apex. This is the primary reason you don’t see two-story A-frame cabins; their natural symmetry simply doesn’t allow for it. Only serious custom modifications can allow for the facilitation of a second-story variation.

Additionally, those dramatic sloping walls make decorating an A-frame nearly impossible. What you end up with is a hostile environment that cannibalizes function while producing tons of underutilized space.

Many people assume a tiny structure comes with an inherent sacrifice. But we believe that coziness should never be a transaction with discomfort. In other words, don’t let your lofty escape be a place where troubles can still find you.

Take a look at this cabin we’re currently building in Astoria, and take note of its size. The soon-to-be occupant worked with us to ensure we avoided any of the aforementioned problems associated with tiny living. Packed in this little unit are two bedrooms, two bathrooms, and a 144 sq. ft. covered porch with plenty of room to spare.

Nothing really defies imagination like saying no. If you’re determined, we’d love to help. We’ve completed many projects here at DC Builders, each one falling on different points along the spectrum. What drives us is our ability to say yes, no matter what project you throw our way.

To get started on your own tiny home or cabin design, request a free quote today.